Some apps appear small on Macbook Pro Retina

Hi,

I've noticed that some apps (such as Steam and Spotify) appear small.

Is there any way I can bring them up to normal size without affecting the whole interface (OS)?

I am using a Macbook Pro Retina (Early 2015) with a display of 2560x1600.

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Can you take a screenshot of the desktop to show this? I couldn't see what you meant by the photo submitted.

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Here.

I've also opened an app that's not affected by this issue.

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I guess that non-GTK apps are affected by small fonts.

OK. I think what is happening it is scaled down to match the rest of the system tray icons.

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So are you saying that I have to scale my system tray icons to fix this issue. I don't know if it's easy as it seems.

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I don't think it's the system tray icons (I assume you mean desktop icons). I just upgraded to Pro and it seems to be persistent.

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I meant the icon that showed up on the right side of the panel, which I presume shows up on launch of Steam or is that the home for the icon launcher?

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Sorry, but I'm confused. Maybe send me a picture of what you mean?

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I was referring to the last image you posted. I don't use Steam. I've got some old rigs that allow me to run some Windows games on them. (Windows 98, XP, 7 all 32-bit. Still never finished Wing Commander III!
But my favourite genre is motor racing. I've got 2 Fanatec Wheels that need dusting off to play Ultimate Race Pro over Netbui network. In terms of realism my 2 favourites are F1 2000 and Pro Rally 2001:

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Soooo, is there a fix for this?

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Basically, it's not scaling with the system. I just tried.

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I wonder if it won't scale because of Retina display? Sorry I don't know enough about Macs.

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Do you at least have a 1440p display or higher? If so, do you have the same issue?

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You stated the main issue was with Steam and Spotify. I use neither.

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Those are a few examples. I'm pretty sure that some other apps appear small, but I don't know because I don't own those apps.

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I wonder if someone else might know about this.

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I think small text is harder to read. Would someone else happen to know about this.

I mean it's a minor issue and it doesn't affect me that much.

It sounds like you are describing an issue with Electron applications. Look at Steam and you may notice that the UI does not follow the UI of the rest of your system.
Electron built applications do not follow the system UI, they pack and bring along their own UI with them.

It is easiest to not use any scaling factor (Like 125%); just use the default, when using and relying on electron apps. The same goes for Wayland. It is easier to log in on the standard x-window system when relying on Electron, than trying to configure Electron to work with Wayland:
https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Wayland#Electron

This is not your fault, Zorin OS's fault... Ubuntus fault.
Whether or not you can say this is Electrons development faults is up in the air... But the real fault is from apps built on a platform like Electron trying to bring their own UI and take control away from the user and place it in the hands of the developer instead.
The developers yearn to have that control and mark their products appearance as their own brand image and ensure that their product looks exactly how they want it to look. Many Browsers engage in this behavior as well, looking for a competitive edge to make their browser look different from other browsers (all based and built on the same thing!) And Gnome Desktop is engaging in this behavior heavily, as well (libadwaita).
This is a very clear fallacy because:

  • Users can have very different tastes and preferences in appearance and what is beautiful in the eyes of the developer may not be so endearing to the user.
  • Users may have different vision, screen, color or readability requirements that is best left under their own direction and control. The developer cannot guess them all and factor them all in. It is preferable and simpler that the user retains control.

The only true solution to confronting developer behavior such as this is to confront it. Place selective pressure on developers to either fix Electrons base standards or for other developers to avoid using Electron as a platform to build their app.
Otherwise, we are left struggling with workarounds or tolerance as outlined above, grumbling about the product that we refuse to refuse to use.
And many of these guys are fully aware that the users will either show apathy or just grumble and keep using the product, so why should they bother to make the product better or fix the grumbles?

I'm not much of a convincer. The devs would probably laugh at me and I feel my words fall flat.