What is "Linux" formatting?

Hi everyone!

I created a single extended partition. When formatting from the drop down menu I could choose ExFat, NTFS etc and "Linux". What file system is that?

Thank you for your help in advance!

Was this via Windows or a Linux install? I would not be touching any partition editor in Windows apart from making space for Linux using Disc Management!

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Agreed.
"Linux" likely refers to the ext4 journaling File system, which creates appropriately sized blocks for file (Allowing room for expansion) - meaning no fragmentation and no need to defrag.
But better to ensure this by checking in the Ubiquity or Calamaras installer with Gparted.

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Linux file systems are many and can't be covered by just 'Linux'. For Example ext2 file system for SSD's - just like Fat32 would be used for SSD's running windows, Ext3 and Ext4 are jounaling Linux systems like NTFS is a journaling system, reiserfs, btrfs, xfs.

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when an application tries to simplify it, usually they screw up because in the end users don't know what the heck that actually means

I can only assume that it means Ext4

I saw on tutorials when i have ssd or nvme to off journaling i talking about installation Zorin guide.
That is good idea?

I do not recommend disabling journaling. An SSD is faster than HDD, but it is not so fast to afford you protection if there is a crash during Write.

Just new ssd and i have one emergency. Nothing to be wrong.


Going with tutorial installation.

Exactly! Which is why it's not clear what "Linux" means.

It happened when I used the "Disks" application in Zorin OS.

screenshot

Just tried it out and it appears as Linux filesystem for me as well, under Disks.

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OK, a bit of a history lesson. There are many GNU/Linux file system formats.
in terms of ExtX formats, they started off with Ext2 (a non-journaling file system, equivalent if you will of a FAT32 Windows installation). Then came Ext3 (the first journaling version of the ExtX File System = the Windows equivalent, NTFS) and the current version is Ext4. Now there are others such as the ReiserFS which I don't like, not least of which is the developer murdered his wife! I had major problems with ReiserFS when I was running SuSE Linux 9.3 Professional - the system went sideways, never to be recovered! A former editor of LXF magazine had a little background information against his picture "If only I had listened to the Ext gods instead of installing ReiserFS!" The ExtX series of File Systems are the most commonly used - the others are a bit more complex for me so I never go near them.

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