File core in home

good evening, lately I happen to find core.xxx files in my home (the xxx are numbers). I was wondering if it was possible to trace the program that generated these files, to understand if it was appropriate to remove it. I use zorin 17, thank you

thanks for the report, but I don't see how to trace the program that generated the file.

Have a look in /var/crash.

I checked the folder is empty.

You can check the logs fount at /var/log/syslog or /var/log/kern.log. Since we don't know the program, you'll have to manually search for something that stands out as an error. You can use the creation time of the core dump file to narrow down the search on the logs to make it easier to find any matches, if there are any.

Can you open the core dump file using the Text Editor program? If it's written in plain text i.e., not gibberish, you should be able to see the program that caused it.

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hi thanks, I had already tried to check the log files and I found this (rfkill: input handler enabled) exactly at the time of creation of the file which coincides with the time the PC was turned off. I'm thinking it's a program called k-drive.
"ICE default IO error handler doing an exit(), pid = 3289, errno = 32"
it could also be your email program:
"Error setting property 'ConnectionStatus' on interface org.gnome.evolution.dataserver.Source: La connessione è chiusa (g-io-error-quark, 18)"

I took some time to check if the problem had been solved. Consulting the log file I identified two possible programs generating the error. I did some tests and realized that the core files were generated by a software called Kdrive, a Cloud manager that I installed via an external package. When you turn off your PC it generates these files in your home. However, if you close the kdrive program before turning off the PC, these files are not generated. Consulting the log files was essential.

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Sometimes there's no other way around this and you just have to dive into the logs to find for irregularities. Sometimes there are obvious errors that you can trace easily but some other times it's a cat and mouse game. Nice catch!

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