Remove user password in Zorin os 16

Please advice me how to remove or disable user password in Zorin 16 os ?

Thanks and Regards

Visakh

It is strongly advised to not remove the password on your system as it is integral to your system security.

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So you want to let the door be open 24/7 to your house so everybody can valse in and grab what they want?

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I agree with both @Aravisian and @Storm -- Linux's password setup is integral to system security, and you are taking a risk by disabling any default password requirements.

Having said that, however, if your system is a desktop computer in a secure location, and you alone have access to the computer, it might be an acceptable risk to change your settings to "autologin" (which eliminates the need to enter your password when you boot the system) and change your settings so that your computer never goes to sleep (functionally eliminating the need to enter your password to "wake up" the computer). The risk might be acceptable but making those changes does entail risk, even with a desktop in a secure location, and would be downright foolish on a laptop.

If one or both of these things are all you want to do, and you are willing to accept the risk, I can provide information about how to change your settings. Just let me know.

Linux also requires your password before you do anything that requires "superuser" (sudo) status -- that is the privilege level to make changes to your system. Eliminating the requirement for a password to obtain sudo privileges is not something you should even consider doing. It effectively eliminates all security on your system.

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I'm sorry Tom but i can't agree with you. The only safe system is one that never sees the internet. Anyone will be able to execute scripts, sudo and any other command they want in his system without a password. It's no worse than giving someone windows with a Trojan, backdoor and key logger preinstalled (you know the basic windows setup). Even enabling the firewall at this point would be pointless. All because they don't like that they have to approve installations and configuration changes? After it's all setup you would barely use it... an update on occasion, that's it. Why remove it?

I wonder if we are talking past each other, addressing different issues.

I said that it might be an acceptable risk to turn on "Autologin" under certain enumerated conditions, and that it might be an acceptable risk to turn off "Autosuspend" under certain enumerated conditions.

Neither has anything to do with the password requirement for obtaining sudo privileges -- the ability, as you put it, to "execute scripts, sudo and any other command they want in his system", including periodic updates:

(1) If "Autologin" is turned on, a password is not required to boot into Zorin, but a password is still required to do anything requiring sudo privileges.

(2) If "Autosuspend" is turned off, all that means is that the computer doesn't go to sleep after a period of inactivity. It does not affect password requirements at all, including the password requirement for sudo privileges.

With respect to the sudo privilege password, I agree with you that turning it off is an unacceptable risk, should not be done under any circumstances, and said as much: "Linux also requires your password before you do anything that requires "superuser" (sudo) status -- that is the privilege level to make changes to your system. Eliminating the requirement for a password to obtain sudo privileges is not something you should even consider doing. It effectively eliminates all security on your system."

Don't take my word for the effect of "Autologin" and "Autosuspend" -- verify. I suggest that you change both "Autologin" and "Autosuspend" settings** temporarily, reboot and then do something that requires sudo privileges (if nothing else, you will run into the sudo password requirement when you attempt to reverse the "Autologin" settings). You'll find, I think, that a password is still required to exercise sudo privileges. You'll also find that "Autologin" does not open your account's keyring***, so that any action that requires the keyring (running certain software for the most part) requires a password. After you've run the test, of course, reverse the two settings.

Changing the "Autologin" and "Autosuspend" settings does entail risk, of course, because anyone with physical access to the computer can boot and/or use the computer. But using the computer and exercising sudo privileges are two different things entirely.

Yup, and the only safe car is one that never leaves the garage.

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** Turning "Autologin" on and "Autosuspend" off are adjustments made though the settings menus, as follows:

(a) To remove the login password requirement on boot: (1) click on the menu button ("Z") to open the Zorin menu, (2) click on "Settings" to open the "Settings" menu, (3) click on "Users" to open the "Users" menu, (4) click on "Unlock" (orange band at top of menu), (5) enter your password to unlock the "User" settings, (6) change the "Automatic Login" slider to the right ("On").

(b) To remove login password requirement after suspend: (1) click on the menu button ("Z") to open the Zorin menu, (2) click on "Settings" to open the "Settings" menu, (3) click on "Power" to open the "Power" menu, (4) change the "Automatic Suspend" slider to the left ("Off").

*** Unlocking the keyring requires sudo privileges, and the login password opens the keyring for the session -- kind of a blanket sudo authorization.

Microsoft refers to Admin or Administration Privileges instead of Root or Sudo - same thing, really.
It asks for a password with a prompt for every Admin action.

Windows users are very well familiar with the Admin password Prompt.

I mistook your removal of the login (bypassing the login screen on boot) for removing all password checks. My mistake.